Transfer of Navy Logistics Functions will Enhance Warfighter Support

Naval Calendar 2009

Naval Calendar 2009

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More than 200 Navy positions at Fleet and Industrial Supply Center (FSIC) San Diego’s Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) Southwest detachment will transfer in place to the Defense Logistics Agency North Island, Calif., when it activates Feb. 15, 2009.

This action is the result of a 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) decision to transfer all supply, storage and distribution (SS&D)functions at service-run maintenance depots, industrial sites and shipyards to DLA to optimize military readiness.

DLA North Island will continue to provide supply, storage and distribution support to maintenance activities on base.

Air Force Brig. Gen. Andy Busch, commander, Defense Supply Center Richmond (DSCR); Bill Bickert, deputy commander, Fleet and Industrial Supply Centers (COMFISC); and Capt. Glenn Robillard, commanding officer of FISC San Diego, met with the detachment’s work force and supervisors Nov. 17. Robillard described the process in place to accomplish the transition.

“This is a well thought-out process. The planning time is over; now it’s execution time. We need to look at how to make this happen. The purpose [of today’s meeting] is to get your questions answered. DLA is ready; FRC Southwest is ready, and the Navy is ready,” Robillard said.

Busch said the BRAC transfer is aimed at achieving inventory efficiencies and enhancing warfighter support. He said BRAC is not just something DLA was told to do; it’s public law.

“As a result of the BRAC-related addition of 12 locations across the country, the total DSCR workforce will add up to nearly 4,500 people. DSCR is leading the way in DLA, and I’m committed to a smooth transition,” said Busch.

“There is no mandate to change or do a manpower reduction; I’m looking for inventory efficiencies to achieve the savings we need to make and to break down the barriers between wholesale and retail,” he said.

Bickert told the group that the big benefit of the SS&D transfer to DLA will come from inventory savings.

We’re watching Cherry Point and Jacksonville and [those transfers] have gone very, very smoothly. This is a testimony to Brigadier General Busch’s leadership,” Bickert said.

He encouraged the FISC employees to embrace the changes ahead.

“We hate to lose mission work, but we think it’s going to benefit DoD in the long run. I encourage you to be excited about this,” Bickert said. “You’re the leading edge of supply chain management.”

DLA and the Navy are working together to smooth the transition for realigned employees, while ensuring continuity of service to warfighters. Similar transfers have already taken place at Navy FRCs at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., in August and at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla., in October.

COMFISCS provides an array of integrated global logistics and contracting services to Navy and joint operational units across all warfare enterprises. COMFISCS is responsible for facilitating best business practices and efficiencies across the seven FISCs located in San Diego; Norfolk; Jacksonville, Fla.; Yokosuka, Japan; Pearl Harbor; Bremerton (Puget Sound), Wash.; and Sigonella, Italy; and for optimizing the performance of base supply functions and standardizing levels of service across 13 regions and 79 Navy installations.

COMFISCS comprises more than 7,500 military and civilian logistics professionals, operating as a single cohesive team providing global logistics services from nearly 135 locations worldwide.

A component of the Naval Supply Systems Command, headquartered in Mechanicsburg, Pa., COMFISCS is part of a worldwide logistics network of more than 25,000 military and civilian personnel providing “One-Touch Supply.”

(NNS)

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