Posts Tagged ‘Eagle’

USAF Aggressors

December 6, 2008

An F-15 Eagle and two F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jets of the US Air Force 64th Aggressor Squadron (64th AGRS) soar over Nevada.

Find this and other exciting images as posters, framed art prints, 2009 calendars, and greeting card sets. Visit the PatriArt Gallery today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available.

American Birds of Prey

December 5, 2008

An F-22 Raptor and an F-15 Eagle fighter jet of the US Air Force patrol the Alaskan coastline along Prince William Sound. Both USAF combat aircraft are assigned to Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska.

Find this and other exciting images as posters, framed art prints, 2009 calendars, and greeting card sets. Visit the PatriArt Gallery today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available.

Spirit of Guam

December 1, 2008

A B-2 Spirit stealth bomber of the United States Air Force flies over Guam.

Find this and other exciting images as posters, framed art prints, 2009 calendars, and greeting card sets. Visit the PatriArt Gallery today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available

American Patrol

November 30, 2008

America’s finest airpower comes together: F-15 Eagle fighters, the mainstay of US Air Force air superiority, join the 21st century’s super-fighter, the F-22 Raptor. Rounding out the scene is an A-10 Thunderbolt II, USAF’s finest tank-killer and close-air-support CAS aircraft.

Find this and other exciting images as posters, framed art prints, 2009 calendars, and greeting card sets. Visit the PatriArt Gallery today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available.

USAF Chief of Staff: F-15 Strike Eagle Still Powerful Weapon System

November 26, 2008

Find this and other exciting images as posters, framed art prints, 2009 calendars, and greeting card sets. Visit the PatriArt Gallery today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available.

Air Force Chief of Staff General Norton Schwartz told the Goldsboro News Argus in a 23 Nov. interview that the F-15E Strike Eagle will remain a powerful weapon system for several more decades.

Reverse! Air Force Wants More Flyboys, Fewer Jets

October 21, 2008
F-15 Eagle and F-16 Falcon
F-15 Eagle and F-16 Falcon

F-15 Eagle and F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jets have been the backbone of US Air Force combat power for more than two decades. Give these warbirds the place of honor they deserve on your wall. Find the F-15 / F-16 “Aggressors” poster, framed art print, or 12-month 2009 calendar at The PatriArt Gallery. (Make great Christmas gifts for the Air Force veteran or military aviation fan on your list, too!)Danger Room’s Noah Schachtman has a typically irreverent take the Air Force’s proposal to scrap major portions of its current combat force — years before replacement aircraft are ready!

“Not too long ago, the Air Force was looking to cut 40,000 people from the service, to pay for more planes. Now: Reverse thrust! The Air Force brass wants to add an extra 13,000 flyboys by 2010. To help pay for the new troops, they’ll retire more than 300 fighter jets early.

In all, the service plans to retire 137 F-15s, 177 F-16s and nine A-10s, according to internal Pentagon documents obtained by Inside Defense . That’s more than 10 percent of the existing fleets. And it means that the F-15s will be retiring seven years early; the F-16s’ service times will be cut short by six years; and the A-10s will head to the boneyard 11 years ahead of schedule.”

Read the rest at Wired.com

USAF Eyes Slashing Fighter Inventory

October 21, 2008
F-15 Eagle & F-16 Fighting Falcon

F-15 Eagle & F-16 Fighting Falcon

F-15 Eagle and F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jets have been the backbone of US Air Force combat power for more than two decades. Give these warbirds the place of honor they deserve on your wall. Find the F-15 / F-16 “Aggressors” poster, framed art print, or 12-month 2009 calendar at The PatriArt Gallery. (Make great Christmas gifts for the Air Force veteran or military aviation fan on your list, too!)

The U.S. Air Force is seeking to retire early more than 300 fighter aircraft next year to save $3.4 billion in the hope of funding advanced fighters and other modernization efforts, a published report said on Wednesday, citing internal Pentagon documents.

The plan would retire 137 F-15 and 177 F-16 fighters plus nine A-10 close air support attack aircraft as much as 11 years before the end of their scheduled useful lives, InsideDefense.com, an online news service, reported.

 

“Without accelerating these retirements, we are left with a larger, less-capable force unable to penetrate anti-access environments,” the Air Force was quoted as telling John Young, the Pentagon’s top arms buyer.

Read the complete report at Reuters

Air Force Plans Massive, Early F-15, F-16 Retirements to Save $3.4 Billion

October 16, 2008
Aggressors

Aggressors

F-15 Eagle and F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jets of the US Air Force 64th Aggressor Squadron (64th AGRS) soar over Nevada.

Get the “Aggressors” Tee-Shirt or Beer Stein at The Military Chest — makes a great gift for the military minded.

Or buy the F-15 Eagle / F-16 Fighting Falcon “Aggressors” poster, framed art print, or 2009 calendar at The PatriArt Gallery.

The Air Force is planning dramatic cuts to its fighter force in fiscal year 2010 in an attempt to find $3.4 billion to bolster other combat aircraft, munitions inventories, ISR and manpower efforts, InsideDefense.com has learned.

In all, the service plans to retire 137 F-15s, 177 F-16s and nine A-10s in FY-10, according to internal Pentagon documents detailing the stand-down of Air Force jets in the 2010 program objective memorandum (POM). Pentagon acquisition chief John Young initialed the Aug. 27 document, which covers all of the services’ future program and budget plans, on Oct. 3, indicating he had reviewed it.

In all, more than 300 fighters will head to the boneyard.

Read the entire article at InsideDefense.com (subscription required)

USAF’s Alaskan radar station goes green

October 12, 2008
Alaskan Birds of Prey

Alaskan Birds of Prey

An F-22 Raptor and an F-15 Eagle fighter jet of the US Air Force defend the Alaskan coastline along Prince William Sound. Both USAF combat aircraft are assigned to Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. Find the Alaskan Birds of Prey poster, framed print, or calendar print at The PatriArt Gallery.

In an effort to reduce high operating costs at the Tin City Long Range Radar Station, engineers with the 611th Civil Engineer Squadron here have completed the construction of a wind turbine generator there.  It is the first such generator to be installed on an Alaskan Air Force installation and within Pacific Air Forces.

The construction at the remote site, located on the Alaska coast near the town of Tin City, was funded by an award of $1.9 million through the Energy Conservation Investment Program, a Department of Defense military construction initiative. 

The ECIP is specifically designed for projects that save energy or reduce defense energy costs. The wind turbine generator will augment the diesel-fueled power production system at Tin City, making it a wind-diesel hybrid.

“I’m very excited about the Tin City wind turbine energy project,” said Col. Brent Johnson, 611th Air Support Group commander. This important milestone for the 611th Air Support Group will be the first renewable Air Force energy project in Alaska and is very timely, given the cost of fuel. Wind energy at Tin City should decrease our annual fuel consumption by 30 to 35 percent, about 85,000 gallons.

The radar site currently is powered by diesel generators. It is located at Cape Prince of Wales on the westernmost point of the North American mainland, on the western tip of the Seward Peninsula in the Bering Sea, approximately 700 miles northwest of Anchorage and approximately 600 miles west of Fairbanks. 

The prevailing winds on the western coast of Alaska put the area in a class seven wind power density zone, the highest possible category. Wind power density is a useful way to evaluate the wind resource available at a site. The WPD indicates how much energy is available at the site for conversion by a wind turbine.

After extensive wind strength and reliability testing, it was determined that Tin City would be the ideal place for a single tower to test the real-world application of wind generation at remote radar stations. During the testing, sustained wind of 83 miles per hour, which is equivalent to a Category 1 hurricane, were experienced. However, according to 611th CES engineers, the average wind speed at Tin City is about 19 miles per hour.

“That’s separate from the maximum sustained wind speed experienced, which was 83 miles per hour,” said Tony Alecci, 611th CES energy management chief. “Not saying it’s 83 miles per hour often, but it illustrates the extreme conditions at the site.” 

A potential annual energy savings of $433,000 is estimated. The current digital control system, to accompany the tower, allows for more control of the existing diesel generators. This allows the site operators to completely shut down the diesel generators when the wind strength is sufficient to power the site. It allows for tailoring the diesel power production to complement the wind production, thus minimizing the fuel usage at the site. The resulting reduction in diesel generator run time is estimated to save $10,000 in reduced maintenance costs annually.

In order to harness the available wind, there were a number of challenges. The first was the amount of icing that coastal sites experience, with Tin City being the worst.

The construction and installation contractor, Tanadgusix Corporation has extensive experience with cold weather wind generation from their St. Paul Island, Alaska, wind turbines. Together with the engineers from the 611th CES, a cutting-edge cold weather package was developed to meet the unique needs of such a harsh environment.

The foundation of the package is an electric based heat system that blows warm air up the tower base and through the tips of the turbine blades to shed the expected icing load. 

In addition to icing issues, airfield safety, radar interference and migratory bird strike issues needed to be addressed. Through working with the FAA and the use of Avian studies, potential tower locations were identified that would provide for negligible impacts on any of the three challenges.

“The 611th Air Support Group is working smarter,” said Lt. Col. Charles Busch, former 611th Civil Engineer Squadron commander. “With the installation of the wind turbine at Tin City, we are using proven, commercial, off-the-shelf technology. Similar turbine units are in use at Nikolski, Sand Point and St. Paul Island, Alaska. Wind turbines are not new to the U.S. Air Force, but they are new to Pacific Air Forces and 11th Air Force in Alaska.”

With the reduction in fuel consumption, Colonel Busch said the return on investment should be realized within about four and a half years.

“We have several other wind turbine projects scheduled,” said Colonel Busch. “The 611th CES is currently pursuing wind turbines at Cape Lisburne, Cape Romonzof and Cape Newenham. Engineering work is also taking place to judge the suitability of wind power generation at Eareckson Air Station.” 

By presidential order, federal agencies must improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by three percent annually through the end of fiscal 2015, and, to the extent feasible, implement renewable energy generation projects on agency property for agency use.

“The 611th continues to work aggressively toward meeting the presidential energy goals,” said Colonel Busch.

Tommy Baker (AFNS)

F-15E Strike Eagle Training Center Opens in Suffolk, England

October 2, 2008
Aviation Calendar 2009

Aviation Calendar 2009

The Royal Air Force ( RAF ) aerobatics team Red Arrows soar over RAF Lakenheath airfield. This is but one of 13 thrilling military aviation images in the Aviation Calendar 2009. The Aviation Calendar 2009 is available exclusively at our online PatriArt Gallery, and costs only $ 19.99.

Boeing and the U.S. Air Force celebrated the opening of the new F-15E Mission Training Center (MTC) at Royal Air Force Lakenheath in Suffolk, United Kingdom on 30 September. The center began operations in April 2008 and has supported approximately 350 training missions so far while maintaining a 100 percent availability rate. It provides aircrews with high-fidelity, simulator-based training without the material and personnel costs and environmental issues associated with training on operational aircraft.

“The MTC provides a forum where pilots are able to ‘train as they fight’ on a daily basis,” said Kay Grabanski, F-15E MTC program manager for Boeing. “It is a highly realistic training system that allows pilots to sharpen their skills without putting themselves in harm’s way or adding wear and tear to their aircraft.”

The training center provides two high-fidelity, dual-cockpit F-15E simulators, each with a 360-degree visual system and a robust synthetic environment, as well as instructor/operator and brief/debrief stations. The simulators, enhanced with head-tracked area-of-interest display visual systems, can be operated individually or linked to provide two- or four-ship training within the MTC. They also can be linked locally with two medium-fidelity F-15E Manned Combat Stations to allow local four-ship training. The Lakenheath MTC will join the Air Force’s Distributed Mission Operations (DMO) training network in 2009.

“The Boeing-operated center provides an important training capability that will help ensure operational readiness for the U.S. Air Force,” said Mike Kurth, managing director, Boeing Defence UK. “The 48th Fighter Wing will use the system for introductory, operational and continuation training of all F-15E squadrons.”

Boeing supports this training capability with several key products, including the Visual Integrated Display System, Manned Combat Stations and the Big Tac Combat Environment Server. Boeing also provides the key network elements to enable local and long-haul networked training. Lockheed Martin provides the instructor/operator station, the non-combatant natural environment system and the electro-optical/infrared imaging system, along with geographic databases. SAIC provides the brief/debrief station.

Under the F-15E MTC contract, Boeing has delivered two F-15E MTCs to two other sites — Mountain Home Air Force Base in Idaho and Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in North Carolina.

Boeing has delivered and currently operates six Air Force F-15C MTCs around the world and is the prime contractor for the F-15E and F-16 MTC contracts. Boeing also is integrating the F-22 Raptor into the DMO training network.