Posts Tagged ‘F/A-18’

Boeing, US Navy to Offer F/A-18 Super Hornets to Brazil

February 9, 2009

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Boeing and the U.S. Navy on Feb. 2 delivered a proposal to the Brazilian Air Force (FAB) offering the advanced, multirole F/A-18E/F Super Hornet as part of Brazil’s F-X2 fighter aircraft competition. 

The Super Hornet was one of three aircraft selected by the FAB in October 2008 to be evaluated in the Request for Proposal phase of the F-X2 competition. Brazil’s stated requirement is for 36 aircraft; final contract award is expected in late 2009.

“We are pleased to offer the Brazilian Air Force the advanced combat capability the Block II Super Hornet delivers,” said Bob Gower, vice president of F/A-18 and EA-18 Programs for Global Strike Systems, Boeing Integrated Defense Systems. “We believe this proposal will meet the Brazilian Air Force’s operational requirements and reflects the U.S. government’s decision to release Super Hornet technology.

“Boeing is looking forward to the opportunity to establish long-term partnerships with the Brazilian Air Force, Brazilian industry and the government of Brazil,” Gower added.

The Super Hornet, with core strengths in both performance and technology, is the most advanced multipurpose strike fighter in production today, with a proven performance record through more than 500,000 hours of flight time. It is operated by the U.S. Navy and is currently being built for the Royal Australian Air Force. The Super Hornet program has continued to add capability to the aircraft while decreasing cost over its lifetime. In addition, the Super Hornet is the first operationally deployed strike fighter incorporating next-generation capabilities, including the Raytheon-built APG-79 Active Electronically Scanned Array radar, which the U.S. government released to Brazil as part of the Super Hornet offering.

Boeing has delivered more than 380 Super Hornets to the U.S. Navy, all on or ahead of the original production delivery schedule. Australia is procuring Super Hornets to bolster its fleet of F/A-18 Hornets. Boeing is in discussions with several other international customers about their interest in procuring the Super Hornet.

Find the latest books on the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet at Amazon.com

Blue Angels — Sneak Pass

December 3, 2008

The US Navy Blue Angels aerobatic team’s Lead Solo hits the deck to perform the Sneak Pass flight maneuver at 700 MPH and just 50 feet above the ground in his F/A-18 Hornet jet fighter.

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Knighthawk Over Iraq

November 30, 2008

An F/A-18C Hornet, assigned to the “Knighthawks” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 136, heads home during sunset over Iraq after completing a close air support mission in support of U.S. and coalition ground forces.

 

Find this and other exciting images as posters, framed art prints, 2009 calendars, and greeting card sets. Visit the PatriArt Gallery today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available.

The Blue Angels

November 30, 2008

The perfect gift for the patriot, sailor, pilot or military enthusiast on your Christmas or Channukah list. The US Navy’s Blue Angels aerobatic team soar under the American Revolutionary motto “Don’t Tread On Me!”

Find this and other exciting images as posters, framed art prints, 2009 calendars, and greeting card sets. Visit the PatriArt Gallery today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available.

At the end of World War II, Adm. Chester W. Nimitz, the Chief of Naval Operations, ordered the formation of a flight demonstration team to keep the public interested in Naval Aviation. The Blue Angels performed their first flight demonstration less than a year later in June 1946 at their home base, Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, Florida. Flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat, they were led by Lt. Cmdr. Roy “Butch” Voris.

Only two months later on August 25, 1946, the Blue Angels transitioned to the Grumman F8F Bearcat and introduced the famous “diamond” formation.

By the end of the 1940s, the Blue Angels were flying their first jet aircraft, the Grumman F9F-2 Panther. In response to the demands placed on Naval Aviation in the Korean Conflict, the team reported to the aircraft carrier USS Princeton as the nucleus of Fighter Squadron 191 (VF-191), “Satan’s Kitten”, in 1950.

They were reorganized the next year and reported to NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, where they began flying the newer and faster version of the Panther, the F9F-5. The Blue Angels remained in Corpus Christi until the winter of 1954 when they relocated to their present home at NAS Pensacola, Florida. It was here that they progressed to the swept-wing Grumman F9F-8 Cougar.

The ensuing 20 years saw the Blue Angels transition to two more aircraft, the Grumman F11F-1 Tiger (1957) and the McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II (1969).

In December 1974, the Navy Flight Demonstration Team began flying the McDonnell Douglas A-4F Skyhawk II and was reorganized into the Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron. This reorganization permitted the establishment of a commanding officer vice a flight leader, added support officers, and further redefined the squadron’s mission emphasizing the support of recruiting efforts. Cmdr. Tony Less was the squadron’s first official commanding officer.

On November 8, 1986, the Blue Angels completed their 40th anniversary year during ceremonies unveiling their present aircraft, the sleek McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet, the first dual-role fighter/attack aircraft now serving on the nation’s front lines of defense. Since 1946, the Blue Angels have flown for more than 300 million spectators.

Data courtesy USN

Cracks Discovered in Deployed Hornets, Inspections Ordered

October 31, 2008
F/A-18 Hornet

F/A-18 Hornet

Find the US Navy’s  F/A-18 Hornet as a poster, framed print or 2009 calendar. Makes a great Christmas or Chanukah gift for the naval aviation fan on your list. Visit the PatriArt Gallery today.

Naval Air Systems Command issued a bulletin late last week ordering inspections for the entire fleet of 636 F/A-18A-D Hornet fighter jets due to cracks discovered on several deployed aircraft.

Read the full report at Inside Defense (subscription required)

Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center Receives Unit’s First F/A-18F Super Hornet

October 24, 2008

Dont Tread On Me!

Blue Angels: Don’t Tread On Me! Wear this American legend proudly as a tee-shirt or on dozens of other clothing items. Sold exclusively at The Military Chest.

The commander of Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (NSAWC) landed the unit’s first F/A-18F Super Hornet at it’s new home at Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nev. Oct. 21.

Rear Admiral Mark T. Emerson took custody of the two-seat Super Hornet from the “Flying Eagles” of Strike Fighter Squadron 122 (VFA 122) at NAS Lemoore, Calif., and flew the aircraft back to its new home.

NSAWC currently has 23 A-D series F/A-18s, but this is the unit’s first F-series Super Hornet. In addition to a training center, NSAWC is responsible for tactics and weapons development for the fleet.

“This Super Hornet acquisition brings our flight line into the 21st century and facilitates the advanced tactics development efforts by NSAWC staff,” said Emerson.

NSAWC has also received two E-2C Hawkeye’s and transitioned from their SH-60F Seahawks to the MH-60S helicopters. The addition of these aircraft to the flight line required the maintenance department to make some adjustments.

“The whole process took about eight months, and there were a lot of obstacles that had to be overcome. We had to ensure our folks were properly trained to repair the different types of equipment associated with the F/A-18F. This consisted of attending ‘difference’ training held at NAS Lemoore or NAS Oceana,” said
Lt. Cmdr. Scot Husa, NSAWC maintenance officer.

“Additionally, we had to obtain the many different tools and special test equipment required for supporting this platform.”

The F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, which made their maiden voyage aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) in July 2002, may look similar to the smaller A-D Hornets, but have been fitted with new mission computers, fiber-optic networks, targeting pods, joint helmet-mounted cueing systems and next-generation sidewinder air-to-air missiles.

The Super Hornet’s two F414-GE-400 engines are larger and provide 22,000 of thrust, with afterburner giving the aircraft a maximum speed in excess of Mach 1.8.

“NSAWC performs a significant amount of tactics development and evaluation in order to support the fleet. Having the Super Hornet increases the accuracy and credibility of NSAWC’s tactics and implementations of tactics and development into the fleet,” said Lt. Cmdr. Don Bowker, NSAWC assistant operations officer.

In the coming months NSAWC is scheduled to receive a total of six F/A-18F’s from various squadrons.

Jeffrey Wells (NNS)

Laux: Navy has 15 Months to Decide How to Handle Strike-Fighter Gap

October 16, 2008
Naval Calendar 2009

Naval Calendar 2009

Our Naval Calendar 2009 features 13 images of US Navy and allied naval forces in action. Buy the Naval Calendar 2009 exclusively at the PatriArt Gallery for only $ 19.99. Worldwide delivery available.

With the shutdown of the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet production line looming, the Navy has a little more than a year to decide what balance of new Super Hornet buys and legacy A-D Hornet service-life extensions will be necessary to mitigate the projected strike-fighter shortfall, Thomas Laux, the Navy air acquisition czar, told Inside the Navy last week.

Sight of Sound

September 2, 2008
Sight of Sound

Sight of Sound

The classic Sight of Sound image can be yours — order a 12 month 2009 calendar print, a poster, or even a framed art print at The PatriArt Gallery.

The classic Sight of Sound image was shot July 7, 1999 by US Navy Ensign John Gay. It shows how Navy Lt. Ron Candiloro’s F/A-18 Hornet creates a shock wave as he breaks the sound barrier. The shock wave is visible as a large cloud of condensation formed by the cooling of the air. A smaller shock wave can be seen forming on top of the canopy.

It is possible for a skilled pilot to work the plane’s throttle to move the shock wave forward or aft.

At the time this F/A-18 Hornet Sight of Sound picture was taken, Lt. Candiloro was assigned to Fighter Squadron 151, and deployed with the USS Constellation battle group.

The Blue Angels

August 30, 2008
The Blue Angels

The Blue Angels

The perfect gift for the Fourth of July Independence Day holiday or any other patriotic American occasion. The US Navy’s Blue Angels aerobatic team soar under the American Revolutionary motto “Don’t Tread On Me!” Find this Blue Angels “Don’t Tread On Me!” theme as a poster, framed print, or calendar exclusively at The PatriArt Gallery.

At the end of World War II, Adm. Chester W. Nimitz, the Chief of Naval Operations, ordered the formation of a flight demonstration team to keep the public interested in Naval Aviation. The Blue Angels performed their first flight demonstration less than a year later in June 1946 at their home base, Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, Florida. Flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat, they were led by Lt. Cmdr. Roy “Butch” Voris.

Only two months later on August 25, 1946, the Blue Angels transitioned to the Grumman F8F Bearcat and introduced the famous “diamond” formation.

By the end of the 1940s, the Blue Angels were flying their first jet aircraft, the Grumman F9F-2 Panther. In response to the demands placed on Naval Aviation in the Korean Conflict, the team reported to the aircraft carrier USS Princeton as the nucleus of Fighter Squadron 191 (VF-191), “Satan’s Kitten”, in 1950.

They were reorganized the next year and reported to NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, where they began flying the newer and faster version of the Panther, the F9F-5. The Blue Angels remained in Corpus Christi until the winter of 1954 when they relocated to their present home at NAS Pensacola, Florida. It was here that they progressed to the swept-wing Grumman F9F-8 Cougar.

The ensuing 20 years saw the Blue Angels transition to two more aircraft, the Grumman F11F-1 Tiger (1957) and the McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II (1969).

In December 1974, the Navy Flight Demonstration Team began flying the McDonnell Douglas A-4F Skyhawk II and was reorganized into the Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron. This reorganization permitted the establishment of a commanding officer vice a flight leader, added support officers, and further redefined the squadron’s mission emphasizing the support of recruiting efforts. Cmdr. Tony Less was the squadron’s first official commanding officer.

On November 8, 1986, the Blue Angels completed their 40th anniversary year during ceremonies unveiling their present aircraft, the sleek McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet, the first dual-role fighter/attack aircraft now serving on the nation’s front lines of defense. Since 1946, the Blue Angels have flown for more than 260 million spectators.

Data courtesy USN