Posts Tagged ‘Iraq War’

Gates Pledges “Active” Role as Obama Defense Secretary

December 13, 2008

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Tuesday that he had no intention of being a “caretaker” at the Pentagon and that he agreed with what he termed President-elect Barack Obama’s “responsible drawdown” plan for American combat troops from Iraq.

The defense secretary did not explicitly endorse Mr. Obama’s campaign pledge to withdraw all combat troops within 16 months.

Instead, Mr. Gates said he supported the broad outlines of Mr. Obama’s Iraq strategy and gave indications that he and the president-elect could reach common ground on troop withdrawals over the next year.

Read the full article at NYT

DOD Finishing $80 Billion War Spending Request; $50 Billion for New Hardware

November 26, 2008
Naval Calendar 2009

Naval Calendar 2009

Our Naval Calendar 2009 features 13 images of US Navy and allied naval forces in action. Buy the Naval Calendar 2009 exclusively at the PatriArt Gallery for only $ 19.99. Worldwide delivery available.

 

The Defense Department is finalizing a war-cost spending request worth approximately $80 billion to pay for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan through next October, reports Inside Defense. The latest emergency supplemental proposal, which includes nearly $50 billion for new military hardware, could be sent to Congress as soon as next week.

“It’s almost ready,” said a Pentagon official of the second fiscal year 2009 supplemental spending request.

Added to the $66 billion “bridge” appropriation allocated by Congress to cover war costs through next spring, the approximately $80 billion request in the works would bring the total FY-09 Pentagon price tag for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan to nearly $150 billion. Read the full Report (paid subscription required)

Iraqis make progress on logistics

November 24, 2008

Find this and other exciting images as posters, framed art prints, 2009 calendars, and greeting card sets. Visit the PatriArt Gallery today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available.

For a long time, the shortcomings of Iraqi security forces were glaringly obvious in an often underappreciated aspect of war fighting: logistics.

Without a ready supply of spare parts, fuel for vehicles, trained mechanics and ammunition chiefs, combat operations can come to a grinding halt. That’s what happened in 2007, for example, when a group of Iraqi soldiers, en route to a raid on suspected terrorists in the country’s north, got stuck on the roadside. They simply ran out of gasoline.

Logistics are “the lifeblood of any operation,” said U.S. Army Col. Edward Dorman, chief logistician for Multi-National Corps–Iraq.

Dorman has spent the past year trying to eliminate the Iraqi security forces’ weakness in logistics, a shortcoming that has hindered efforts to turn them into a self-reliant military.

Read the full article at S&S

Pentagon Wary of Fast Iraq Withdrawal

November 24, 2008

Find exciting military and patriotic images on tee-shirts, caps, and other casual clothing for adults and kids, as well as on beer steins, mousepads, decorative keepsake boxes, clocks, and dozens of other office and gift items. Visit The Military Chest today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available.

 

President-elect Barack Obama is facing an early confrontation with the Pentagon over the hot-button issue of how fast to withdraw U.S. forces from Iraq, with some senior officers arguing for a slower drawdown.

Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told reporters that the withdrawal should be driven solely by conditions on the ground in Iraq. The statement ran counter to Mr. Obama’s frequent calls for a fixed timetable for a drawdown.

“I do think it’s important that it be conditions-based,” Adm. Mullen said. “I certainly understand there are other options, and it’s something that we look at all the time. But…from the military’s perspective, I think it’s best to be conditions-based.” Adm. Mullen, the nation’s top uniformed military officer, was quick to stress that he would carry out whatever orders he received from the new president next year. Still, the comments suggested that Mr. Obama may face a military establishment that deeply disagrees with one of his core policies.

Brooke Anderson, a spokeswoman for the Obama transition team, said the president-elect remains committed to withdrawing all U.S. combat forces within 16 months of taking office.

The comments from Adm. Mullen came a day after the Iraqi cabinet approved a long-debated security pact that would require U.S. forces to leave all of Iraq’s cities by next summer in preparation for a full military withdrawal by the end of 2011. Read the complete WSJ article

Iraqi SOFA Requires US Forces Get Search Warrants

November 24, 2008

Find this and other exciting military and patriotic images as posters, framed art prints, 2009 calendars, and greeting card sets. Visit the PatriArt Gallery today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available.

Some U.S. troops in Iraq could begin applying for warrants before detaining terrorist suspects or searching Iraqi homes as soon as Dec. 1 — a month before they might become required to do so under a new status-of-forces agreement.

Military sources, who asked not to be identified because of the sensitivity of the topic, said at least some units of the 4th Infantry Division in Baghdad would begin obtaining warrants from Iraqi legal authorities next month before making arrests or searching homes for weapons caches and other contraband in noncombat situations.

Read the full article at Washington Times

Mullen: Exit dates in Iraq deal not a problem

November 24, 2008

Find exciting military and patriotic images on tee-shirts, caps, and other casual clothing for adults and kids, as well as on beer steins, mousepads, decorative keepsake boxes, clocks, and dozens of other office and gift items. Visit The Military Chest today — your one-stop shopping site for military and patriotic themed holiday gifts. Worldwide delivery available.

The chairman of the Joint Chiefs confirmed Monday that the new U.S. agreement with Iraq calls for all U.S. troops to be completely out of Iraq by the end of 2011 and that he is “comfortable” with the deal.

“It is my understanding that the 2011 date [means] all American forces [must be] out,” said Navy Adm. Mike Mullen.

The specifics of the agreement have not been publicly released, although the Associated Press reports that the SOFA includes a Dec. 31, 2011 pullout date for all the roughly 151,000 U.S. troops in the country and that it is scheduled for a Nov. 24 vote.

The AP has also reported that according to the agreement, U.S. troops must be out of all Iraqi villages and towns by June 30, 2009. Asked at a Pentagon press conference whether that was his understanding, Mullen did not correct the date and, noting that a number of Iraqi provinces have already been turned over to ISF control, said such a shift is “consistent with how we have moved.”

Mullen said he is “delighted” that the Status of Forces Agreement Read the entire Army Times article

Iraq Takes Aim at U.S.-Tied Sunni Groups’ Leaders

August 23, 2008
Pentagon

Pentagon

Own the Pentagon. Visit the PatriArt Gallery to purchase your Pentagon calendar, poster, framed art print, or greeting card set.

The Shiite-dominated government in Iraq is driving out many leaders of Sunni citizen patrols, the groups of former insurgents who joined the American payroll and have been a major pillar in the decline in violence around the nation, reports the New York Times.

In restive Diyala Province, United States and Iraqi military officials say there were orders to arrest hundreds of members of what is known as the Awakening movement as part of large security operations by the Iraqi military. At least five senior members have been arrested there in recent weeks, leaders of the groups say.

West of Baghdad, former insurgent leaders contend that the Iraqi military is going after 650 Awakening members, many of whom have fled the once-violent area they had kept safe. While the crackdown appears to be focused on a relatively small number of leaders whom the Iraqi government considers the most dangerous, there are influential voices to dismantle the American backed movement entirely.

“The state cannot accept the Awakening,” said Sheik Jalaladeen al-Sagheer, a leading Shiite member of Parliament. “Their days are numbered.”

The government’s rising hostility toward the Awakening Councils amounts to a bet that its military, feeling increasingly strong, can provide security in former guerrilla strongholds without the support of these former Sunni fighters who once waged devastating attacks on United States and Iraqi targets. It also is occurring as Awakening members are eager to translate their influence and organization on the ground into political power.

But it is causing a rift with the American military, which contends that any significant diminution of the Awakening could result in renewed violence, jeopardizing the substantial security gains in the past year. United States commanders say that the practice, however unconventional, of paying the guerrillas has saved the lives of hundreds of American soldiers.

Read the entire article at the New York Times

Army Orders More Stryker Mobile Gun Systems

August 21, 2008

The U.S. Army TACOM Lifecycle Management Command has awarded General Dynamics Land Systems a contract for the production of 62 Stryker Mobile Gun System (MGS) variant vehicles. The contract has a
total potential value of $326.5 million including initial funding of
$145 million.

Work will be performed in Anniston, Ala.; Sterling Heights, Mich.; Lima, Ohio; Scranton, Pa.; Tallahassee, Fla., and London, Ontario, Canada, and is expected to be completed by February 2010.

The Stryker MGS variant is a direct-fire infantry assault platform with
a 105mm cannon mounted in a low-profile, fully stabilized, “shoot-on-the-move” turret and integrated into the Stryker chassis.  It carries 18 rounds of NATO-standard 105mm main gun ammunition; 400 rounds of .50 caliber ammunition; and 3,400 rounds of 7.62mm ammunition.  It destroys vehicles, equipment and hardened positions with its bunker and wall-breaching capability.

Stryker is a family of eight-wheel-drive combat vehicles that can travel at speeds up to 62 mph on highways, with a range of 312 miles.  It operates with the latest C4ISR equipment as well as detectors for nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. 

In addition to the MGS, Stryker vehicle configurations include: the nuclear, biological and chemical detection vehicle; anti-tank guided missile and medical evacuation vehicles; and carriers for mortars,
engineer squads, command groups, and fire-support teams.  The MGS has more than 70 percent common components with the rest of the 310 Strykers that comprise a brigade combat team, which eases the unit’s training and logistics burden.

Since being deployed to combat in 2007, the MGS vehicles have logged 79,000 miles, fired 600 main gun rounds, thousands of coax rounds and survived numerous insurgent attacks and improvised explosive device (IED) detonations.

The Army has seven Stryker Brigade Combat Teams.  Stryker is the Army’s highest-priority production combat vehicle program and the centerpiece of the ongoing Army Transformation.  Significantly lighter and more transportable than existing tanks and armored vehicles, Stryker fulfills an immediate requirement to equip a strategically deployable (C-17/C-5) and operationally deployable (C-130) brigade capable of rapid movement anywhere on the globe in
a combat-ready configuration. 

Stryker Brigade Combat Teams have operated with “historically high” mission availability rates in Iraq since October 2003, demonstrating the value of a force that can move rapidly as a cohesive and networked combined-arms combat team.

General Petraeus: “My Philosophy on War”

June 27, 2008

 

General David Petraeus, commander of US Central Command and leader of all US forces in the Middle East and Central Asia, has published a list of 23 “lessons learned” from the Iraq war.