Posts Tagged ‘SOF’

Special Operations: The Global Struggle

February 18, 2009

Get the real story: Special Operations Force: The Secret Soldier

While Iraq and Afghanistan have the greatest number of U.S. troops, the Special Operations Command is engaged in counter-terrorism operations around the world. [ FULL STORY ]
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Navy SEALs Rescue American Hostage in Afghanistan: How they Did It

November 13, 2008
Naval Special Operations

Naval Special Operations

Find posters, framed prints, and 2009 calendars featuring US Navy special operations forces including Navy SEALs at The PatriArt Gallery. Find the perfect Christmas or Chanukhah gift for the military enthusiast on your list.

US Navy SEALS rescued a 61 year old American engineer held hostage in the remote mountains of Afghanistan. Read the gripping details of this heroic airborne operation by America’s finest Special Operations Forces.

Rehorn: Irregular Warfare Shift Among Services is Acceptable Risk

October 24, 2008
Naval Special Operations

Naval Special Operations

Put American heroes on your wall. Check out our selection of posters, framed prints, and calendars with Special Operations themes at The PatriArt Gallery. Make great holiday gifts, too.

Some in the Pentagon worry the armed services are becoming too dependent on irregular warfare, but one military official in charge of training commanders how to use special operations forces argues the risk of becoming too heavily invested in IW skills is acceptable given the current threat environment, writes Inside the Pentagon.
Some active-duty and retired general officers have warned that focusing on IW capabilities could lead to an erosion of more traditional warfare skill sets over time. That erosion of conventional warfare capabilities could put U.S. forces at a disadvantage should a more conventional conflict erupt, these officers argue.

But until the Defense Department is able to develop overarching guidance to properly balance irregular and conventional warfare skill sets within general purpose forces, the risk of swaying too far toward IW capability is one that U.S. force will have to accept, Col. Wesley Rehorn told Inside the Pentagon in an Oct. 14 interview. “Is there a possibility that the general purpose forces could sort of tip that teeter-totter too far to being more SOF-like? No doubt about it,” Rehorn said.

Read more at Inside Defense (subscription required)

JFCOM Official Suggests Permanent Special Ops Presence Worldwide

October 21, 2008
Aviation Calendar 2009

Aviation Calendar 2009

Our military Aviation Calendar 2009 features 13 images of US and allied military aircraft in action. Buy the Aviation Calendar 2009 exclusively at the PatriArt Gallery for only $ 19.99. Worldwide delivery available.

Elite U.S. forces are strengthening ties with coalition forces in Europe and Africa, driven by the belief that the future of special operations will hinge on forging permanent ties with partner nations to maintain a sustained, long-term, global presence.

Read all at InsideDefense.com (Subscription Required)

JFCOM, SOCOM Mull Possible Stand-Up of New Task Forces in Africa

October 21, 2008
Aviation Calendar 2009

Aviation Calendar 2009

Our military Aviation Calendar 2009 features 13 images of US and allied military aircraft in action. Buy the Aviation Calendar 2009 exclusively at the PatriArt Gallery for only $ 19.99. Worldwide delivery available.

U.S. Africa Command’s special operations shop is mulling the possibility of standing up new elite task forces on the continent, a military official involved tells Inside the Pentagon. (Subscription Required)

Pentagon envisions spaceship troops

October 17, 2008
Death Glider

Death Glider

Worthy of a Stargate SG-1 episode — US Air Force F-117 Nighthawk stealth fighters and a USAF B-2 Spirit stealth bomber become death gliders in this artist enhanced image. If you’re a Sci Fi fan, you’ll want the Deathglider Tee-Shirt.

The Pentagon wants to rocket troops through space to hot spots anywhere on the globe within two hours, and planners spent two days last month discussing how to do it, military documents show.

Read more about the Rocket Rangers at USA Today

17th ASOS transitions from ACC to AFSOC

October 12, 2008
Aviation Calendar 2009

Aviation Calendar 2009

Our military Aviation Calendar 2009 features 13 images of US and allied military aircraft in action. Buy the Aviation Calendar 2009 exclusively at the PatriArt Gallery for only $ 19.99. While you’re there, check out our AFSOC themed posters and art prints too. Worldwide delivery available.

The 17th Air Support Operations Squadron transitioned from Air Combat Command to the 720th Special Tactics Group, Air Force Special Operations Command, in a ceremony at the Hurlburt Field Air Park Oct. 1. 

The 17th ASOS has 61 special operations forces Tactical Air Control Party Airmen and support personnel. The squadron will join the ranks of more than 900 special tactics combat controllers, pararescuemen, special operations weathermen and support personnel. 

“The men of the 17th are the crown jewel of all TACPs- the top 10 percent of their career field,” said Col. Bradley Thompson, 720th STG commander. “They are the most highly decorated TACP unit in the Air Force and have been involved in every contingency since 1983. The Air Force knows how valuable they are and we are so lucky to have our SOF brothers join us.” 

Among the many awards the 17th ASOS has earned are four Outstanding Unit Awards, one with valor, and the Gallant Unit Citation. The Gallant Unit Citation recognizes organizations for outstanding heroism in combat and is only second to the Presidential Unit Citation. Units must have performed with marked distinction under difficult and hazardous conditions in accomplishing its mission so as to set it apart from and above other units participating in the same conflict. 

The 17th ASOS is bringing a rich history of proven combat experience and this move is beneficial to everyone involved, said Lt. Col. Christopher Cronk, 17th ASOS commander.
 
“Not only am I the commander of the best TACP squadron in the Air Force, but now we join the ranks of the most outstanding group in the Air Force,” said Colonel Cronk. “This move is beneficial because we provide Joint Terminal Attack Controllers – JTACs – to all special operations forces and the SOF mission belongs in AFSOC.” 

The squadron provides terminal attack and liaison services to the 75th Ranger Regiment and its 1st, 2nd, 3rd and Regimental Special Troops Battalions, and the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th and 10th Special Forces Groups. 

“These men have the right leadership and the right synergy and this transition was the right thing to do,” said Colonel Thompson.
 
The 17th ASOS will remain at Fort Benning, Ga., with operational locations at Hunter Army Airfield, Ga., Fort Campbell, Ky., Fort Bragg, N.C., Fort Carson, Colo. And Fort Lewis, Wash.

Buffy Galbraith

Air Force Special Ops weathermen get new specialty code

October 9, 2008
Aviation Calendar 2009

Aviation Calendar 2009

Our military Aviation Calendar 2009 features 13 images of US and allied military aircraft in action. Buy the Aviation Calendar 2009 exclusively at the PatriArt Gallery for only $ 19.99. Worldwide delivery available.

Air Force special operations weathermen now have a new specialty code they can call their own.

Recruiters can enlist trainees directly into the 1W0X2 special operations weathermen career field since the new Air Force specialty code is now in the enlisted classification directory.

Before this new AFSC, weather Airmen applied to become special operations weathermen after already being in the Air Force, They were sent to work and live on an Army post where they relied on the Army for equipment and training. There was no standardized training, according to Chief Master Sgt Andrew Hopwood, Air Force Special Operations Command weather functional manager.

“The new AFSC will provide special operations weathermen the right technical, physical and tactical training from day one. This will greatly enhance their battlefield observing, environmental reconnaissance and forecasting missions,” Chief Hopwood said.

Because of time between classes, Airmen previously spent four years training to become special operations weathermen. Under the new program, they will finish training in approximately two and half years. The first basic military training graduates will enter the new training pipeline in January 2009.

Trainees will attend the two-week Special Operations Weathermen Selection Course at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. This is a physical training assessment with progressive training to prepare candidates for the next phase.

After the selection course, students will attend their initial-skills course at Keesler AFB, Miss., for 30 weeks where they will go through the Air Force Weather Course and endure additional physical training elements.

Upon completion of their initial-skills course, they will earn their jump qualification from airborne school at Fort Benning, Ga and attend survival school at Fairchild AFB, Wash. They will then train side-by-side with combat controllers during the Special Operations Weather Apprentice Course at Pope AFB, N.C. before being assigned to the Special Tactics Training Squadron here. They will learn additional weather skills necessary to deploy and operate in stressful environments. Training also will include basic communication, navigation, employment techniques, weapons training and small unit tactics.

Special operations weathermen have 99 slots, but are currently only 65 percent manned. Once Airmen become special operations weathermen, they will be assigned to Hurlburt’s 10th Combat Weather Squadron and will be stationed at detachments across the United States.

Jeremy Webster

Book Review: Never Surrender, by Gen. Wm. Boykin

August 12, 2008

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From his childhood in the North Carolina tobacco fields to the Army, Lt. General William G. (Jerry) Boykin tells the story of his life and his career in his new book, Never Surrender, with his co-author Lynn Vincent. Through the triumphs and trials of his career, one constant in LTG Boykin’s life was his Christian faith and how that faith sustained him through various missions, deaths of close comrades in combat and the attack upon his character, and threat to his career, from the media.

Boykin always wanted to be a Soldier, growing up in a family with a rich military history. His story is an amazing journey from the tobacco fields, through college at Virginia Tech and his acceptance into the Corps of Cadets (ROTC), into his first duties as an officer. His story details his experiences in Ranger School at Fort Benning, a stint in Korea and eventually Viet Nam at the end of the Viet Nam war, to the call he received in 1977 at his new duty station at the Florida Ranger Camp at Elgin AFB, which lead him into being one of the “elite warriors” chosen to make up the first DELTA Force.

 Read the entire book review at A Soldier’s Mind