Posts Tagged ‘Virtual Training’

Boeing and Creative Technologies Train US Soldiers for War

December 13, 2008
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Boeing has announced a teaming arrangement with Creative Technologies Inc. (CTI) of Hollywood, Calif., to explore new training solutions for the military and law enforcement. The agreement brings together Boeing’s expertise in aviation training systems and CTI’s experience in game-based simulations for ground forces training.

“This agreement allows us to take what we do well and translate it into new possibilities for Boeing in the ground training and simulation arena,” said Mark McGraw, vice president for Training Systems and Services, a division of Boeing Integrated Defense Systems Global Services and Support. “We are committed to finding new ways to use the talents of both companies to expand the services we’re able to offer the military.”

The agreement formalizes an ongoing relationship — CTI is a contributor to the Boeing Future Combat Systems program, and Boeing and CTI are partners in the U.S. Army’s Fires Center of Excellence integration effort at Fort Sill, Okla. The Army approached Boeing and CTI to offer guidance in developing an organization and a training strategy to consolidate the Army’s Air Defense Artillery School and Center, previously based at Fort Bliss, Texas, and the Field Artillery School and Center based at Fort Sill. The Boeing-CTI team is making recommendations for potential synergies and long-term training strategies while developing a technology plan to support current and future Fires Center of Excellence missions.

“We’re excited to combine Boeing’s industry leadership and broad range of capabilities with CTI’s know-how, relationships and agility,” said CTI President and CEO James Korris. “Simulation for ground forces and law enforcement is still, in many ways, in its infancy; we look forward to helping shape this evolving market. We’ve had a great run with Boeing. We’re thrilled to be their teammate.”

One possible area of growth is deployable field-artillery training for soldiers who are either in-theater or home between deployments. “These trainers would be designed to travel to a soldier’s home base or directly to the front lines to keep our warfighters current on their artillery skills,” said McGraw.

Army to invest $50M in combat training games

November 25, 2008
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The Army has created a video game unit and will invest $50 million over five years on games and gaming systems designed to prepare soldiers for combat.Lt. Col. Gary Stephens, product manager for air and ground tactical trainers at Project Executive Office — Simulation Training and Instrumentation said Thursday that the $50 million has been approved for a “games for training” program starting in 2010.

“The Army takes this seriously,” Stephens said of PEO-STRI and its Army gaming unit, which will handle military video game requirements. “We own gaming for the Army — from requirements through procurement,” he said.

Game development has become a multibillion-dollar industry in recent years, with large game studios employing thousands of developers and sales that compete with Hollywood’s blockbusters.

“We want to take advantage of that, but we don’t have the intent to become a competitor with the commercial gaming industry,” Stephens said. “We don’t have the intent or capability to be a commercial game house.”

Instead, the Army gaming unit will watch trends in the industry and identify technology that can be used for military training, he said.

The need for video games  (Read the full article at Stars & Stripes)